You could be earning more on your uninvested cash

As interest rates rise, switching your core position to a money market fund can mean higher returns.


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Interest rates are moving. Maybe your cash should be too.

Your uninvested cash is in a core position called FCASH. With rates at a 5-year high*, you have the option to change your core position to one of our money market funds, which are currently yielding a higher return. Switching will cost you nothing and will not affect how you currently use your account.

FCASH
(Your Current Position)
0.31%
0.66%
Interest Rate
as of September 27, 2018
Fidelity Government Money Market Fund (SPAXX)
 
7-day yield
as of  
Fidelity Treasury Money Market Fund (FZFXX)
 
7-day yield
as of  

Ready to switch?

Changing your core position is easy.

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STEP 1

After logging in, select any position labeled FCASH.

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STEP 2

Select the Change Core Position button.

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STEP 3

Choose a money market fund, select Preview Order, then select Submit.


For questions or to discuss your options, call us at 800-343-3548.

Learn more about

FCASH
FCASH is known as a free credit balance. It is not a money market mutual fund. Your FCASH balance represents funds held by Fidelity payable to you on demand. Fidelity may, but is not required to, pay interest on FCASH balances.

Fidelity Government Money Market Fund (SPAXX)
Seeks as high a level of current income as is consistent with preservation of capital and liquidity. Normally invests at least 99.5% of the fund's total assets in cash, U.S. Government securities and/or repurchase agreements that are collateralized fully.

Fidelity Treasury Money Market Fund (FZFXX)
Seeks as high a level of current income as is consistent with the preservation of capital and liquidity. Normally invests at least 99.5% of the fund's total assets in cash, U.S. Treasury securities and/or repurchase agreements for those securities.

The following is additional information to help you understand the differences between your current FCASH core position and the money market fund core positions, Fidelity Government Money Market Fund and/or Fidelity Treasury Money Market Fund (FZFXX) (the "Fund/s"). It is important to understand these differences and the following are some of the more significant ones to consider. If you would like more information, you should refer to the prospectus for the Fund/s as well as your customer agreement, which provides more detail about free credit balances. For more current information or to gain access to your funds, go to Fidelity.com/prospectus or you may call a representative at 800-544-6666.

Free Credit Balance and a Money Market Fund
FCASH is known as a free credit balance. It is not a money market mutual fund. Your FCASH balance represents funds held by Fidelity payable to you on demand. The Fidelity Government Money Market Fund and Fidelity Treasury Money Market Fund (FZFXX) are money market mutual funds. You invest in the Fund/s through your core position, and you hold shares of the Fund in your account.

Fidelity may, but is not required to, pay interest on FCASH balances. Interest on FCASH balances is payable in accordance with a schedule set by Fidelity, which may be changed at any time.

FCASH has no separately stated fees. Fidelity may use free credit balances in connection with its business. Fidelity would generally expect to earn more on your FCASH balance than it would receive in fees when you use the Fund as your core position.

FDIC and SIPC Protection

Neither FCASH nor the Fund is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). The Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) protects stocks, bonds, and other securities in case a brokerage firm goes bankrupt and assets are missing. It does not cover investment losses due to market fluctuation. SIPC will cover up to $500,000 per customer including up to $250,000 for cash held in a brokerage account.

Because of these limits, you may be eligible for greater SIPC protection if you are invested in the Fidelity Government Money Market Fund or Fidelity Treasury Money Market Fund than would be the case if you held FCASH, a free credit position (which would be considered cash held in a brokerage account).

In addition to SIPC protection, Fidelity provides its brokerage customers with additional "excess of SIPC" coverage. The excess coverage would only be used when SIPC coverage is exhausted. Like SIPC, excess protection does not cover investment losses in customer accounts due to market fluctuation. It also does not cover other claims for losses incurred while broker-dealers remain in business. For example, fraud claims would not be covered if the brokerage firm was still in operation. Total aggregate excess of SIPC coverage available through Fidelity's excess of SIPC policy is $1 billion. Within Fidelity's excess of SIPC coverage, there is no per customer dollar limit on coverage of securities, but there is a per customer limit of $1.9 million on coverage of cash awaiting investment.