• Print
  • Default text size A
  • Larger text size A
  • Largest text size A

Pairs trading

  • Wiley Global Finance WILEY GLOBAL FINANCE
  • Trading
  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • LinkedIn.
  • Google Plus
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Important legal information about the e-mail you will be sending. By using this service, you agree to input your real e-mail address and only send it to people you know. It is a violation of law in some jurisdictions to falsely identify yourself in an e-mail. All information you provide will be used by Fidelity solely for the purpose of sending the e-mail on your behalf.The subject line of the e-mail you send will be "Fidelity.com: "

Your e-mail has been sent.

Pairs trading is a non-directional, relative value investment strategy that seeks to identify two companies or funds with similar characteristics whose equity securities are currently trading at a price relationship that is out of their historical trading range. This investment strategy will entail buying the undervalued security while short-selling the overvalued security, all while maintaining market neutrality. It can also be referred to as market neutral or statistical arbitrage.

Pairs trading is a strategy that tends to use statistics to identify relationships, assist in determining the direction of the relationship, and then ascertain how to execute a trade based on the data. The pairs trader attempts to capitalize on market imbalances between two or more financial instruments, such as stocks or funds, in anticipation of making money when the inequality is corrected.

To measure these relationships, the pairs trader will use statistics, fundamentals, technical analysis, and even probabilities. One of the main keys to pairs trading is finding strong correlations between financial instruments, thus building a foundation for further analysis. The empirical data are then dissected to unearth information that allows the trader an efficient and methodical way of executing successful trades.

Pairs trading is by no means a holy grail of trading and will have its ups and downs, like any other trading style.

Pairs work based on a correlation between two (or more) stocks, sectors, indices, or other financial instruments. Think of a highway and the service road that often runs parallel to it. Generally, the service road follows the highway closely but terrain or development will sometimes cause the two to diverge. The area between the highway and the service road can be thought of as the spread – the measured distance between the two objects traveling together. The pairs trader attempts to measure the spread with statistics in an effort to find a tradable relationship of inequality opportunities.

In a nutshell, pairs trading works by betting that two or more securities will diverge or converge in price. The trader bets that a $50 stock and a $55 stock, for instance, will either have a larger or smaller spread ($5 in this case) when the trade is closed. Divergence traders will like to see the spread increase while convergence traders will prefer to see the spread decrease.

Anyone can use pairs trading but it has tended to be employed by professionals and those with a good understanding of short selling. Transforming pairs trading from a theoretical construct into a practical reality capable of generating profits will involve several steps:

1. Formulate the selection criteria

2. Generate a list of candidate trades 

3. Perform technical, fundamental, or other statistical overlays. 

4. Execute the trade. 

5. Manage the trade. 

6. Close the trade.

The successful execution of each of the steps is a critical element in the process of becoming a profitable pairs trader. As is the case with any trading methodology, the complexity and success of the final three steps, the actual trading, are integrally dependent on the care and skill that go into the first three.

Formulate the Selection Criteria:

This is the most difficult and time consuming step in the process. It includes selecting a trading universe, constructing and testing a model, if one is to be used, and creating general buy and sell guidelines. An individual trader’s resources and expected trade duration will affect each of these factors, but the structure is functionally the same in all cases.

Determine the Candidates:

After a selection process has been defined, a trader must use that process to generate a list of candidate trades. If relying on manual research, the results of this inquiry consititute the list; if relying on a model, the model’s output serves as the list of candidates. The frequency of the procedure will also need to be considered. A trader who intends to hold a given position for several hours to several days will need to generate candidate trade with far greater frequency than a manager whose average holding period is measured in months.

The Overlays:

Pairs traders use some type of analysis methodology to confirm the trade and help customize the buy and sell rules. An overlay analysis will help adjust profit objectives and stop loss levels according to the specifics of a given trade. There are many different types of technical and fundamental overlays that can be employed from candlestick charting to relative strength.

Execute the Trade:

While this would seem to be the most straightforward step in the investment process, there are a few subtleties. Generally speaking, the short side of a trade should be executed and filled before the long order is placed. In addition to the option of manually entering trades, there a some trading programs designed to handle pairs execution. These programs are designed to simultaneously work each side of the trader, particularly for larger orders, in an attempt to hit a pre-specified price ratio. For most traders, such programs are more of a convenience than a necessity because the slippage that occurs during execution is minimal relative to the profit objective of the overall trade.

Manage the Trade:

It is the responsibility of the trader to manage the position according not only to the predetermined buy and sell rules, but also to the changing market environment. The trader must be cognizant of the unexpected news releases affecting either of the instruments in a trade and be prepared to adjust his or her thinking accordingly. Likewise, she must be mindful of the pair’s price action and constantly adjust the risk/return profile of the trade. For example, if a trade with an expected duration of three weeks were to achieve 50 percent of its profit objective in the first day after execution, the trader will want to reevaluate the potential reward for keeping the trade open. In such a situation, the trader could choose one of two options to prudently manage the trade moving forward. The trade could be immediately closed with a view that the additional return does not warrant the risk or the opportunity cost. The other option is to initiate a trailing stop loss level to lock in at least a portion of the profit. The trader will develop a feel for which of these options more suits their particular style, and may make different decisions for different pairs at different times.

Close the Trade:

For a trader who remains disciplined and follows the predetermined buy and sell rules as well as signals received from the market, closing the trade will be the easiest step. The most difficult criterion for a trader to adhere to is the duration limit. It is often difficult to close a trade that is losing a modest sum but has expired as the inclination is to opt to “give it a few days” in the hopes that the break-even level can be restored. The reward is usually larger losses or reduced profits, if from the opportunity cost associated with not putting on other trades alone.

Pairs trading can be profitable but it requires significant research, close monitoring, clear rules, and discipline.

  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • LinkedIn.
  • Google Plus
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Important legal information about the e-mail you will be sending. By using this service, you agree to input your real e-mail address and only send it to people you know. It is a violation of law in some jurisdictions to falsely identify yourself in an e-mail. All information you provide will be used by Fidelity solely for the purpose of sending the e-mail on your behalf.The subject line of the e-mail you send will be "Fidelity.com: "

Your e-mail has been sent.
Article copyright 2011 by Mark Whistler and Douglas S. Ehrman Reprinted and adapted from Trading Pairs: Capturing Profits and Hedging Risk with Statistical Arbitrage Strategies and The Handbook of Pairs Trading: Strategies Using Equities, Options & Futures with permission from John Wiley & Sons, Inc. The statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author. Fidelity Investments® cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any statements or data. This reprint and the materials delivered with it should not be construed as an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy shares of any funds mentioned in this reprint.
The data and analysis contained herein are provided "as is" and without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. Fidelity is not adopting, making a recommendation for or endorsing any trading or investment strategy or particular security. All opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice, and you should always obtain current information and perform due diligence before trading. Consider that the provider may modify the methods it uses to evaluate investment opportunities from time to time, that model results may not impute or show the compounded adverse effect of transaction costs or management fees or reflect actual investment results, and that investment models are necessarily constructed with the benefit of hindsight. For this and for many other reasons, model results are not a guarantee of future results. The securities mentioned in this document may not be eligible for sale in some states or countries, nor be suitable for all types of investors; their value and the income they produce may fluctuate and/or be adversely affected by exchange rates, interest rates or other factors.

Options trading entails significant risk and is not appropriate for all investors. Certain complex options strategies carry additional risk. Prior to trading options, please read Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options, and call 800-343-3548 to be approved for options trading.  Supporting documentation for any claims, if applicable, will be furnished upon request.

In order to short sell at Fidelity, you must have a margin account. Short selling and margin trading entail greater risk, including but not limited to risk of unlimited losses and incurrence of margin interest debt, and are not suitable for all investors. Please assess your financial circumstances and risk tolerance prior to short selling or trading on margin. Margin trading is extended by National Financial Services, Member NYSE/SIPC, a Fidelity Investments company.

1. Active Trader Services are available to investors in households that place 120 or more stock, bond, or options trades in a rolling twelve-month period and maintain $25K in assets across their eligible Fidelity brokerage accounts.
605649.3.0