Investing Ideas

The latest on stocks, bonds and funds, plus strategies to help manage your portfolio.

Mutual Funds & ETFs

  • How retirees can prosper from preferred stocks

    Today’s low yields make it harder to find a solid stream of retirement income without taking on added risk. If you’re willing to do the research, preferred stocks may be part of the answer.
  • A mid-cap strategy for long-term investors

    Co-managers Kevin Toney and Phil Davidson use a 'quality first, value second' approach to stock picking. Their fund has bested three benchmarks and 95% of its peers. Here's what they like now.
  • 3 dividend stocks from a veteran manager

    Don Taylor of Franklin Templeton doesn't pay too much attention to current dividend yields. Instead, he likes to focus on companies with a history of big dividend increases.
  • Small caps with favorable returns on equity

    These mutual fund managers look for growth stocks with insider ownership and high returns on equity. Here are four that fit the bill.

Stocks

  • October's frightening reputation shouldn't scare investors

    From October 1929 to October 2008, the month has a frightening reputation for financial mayhem. This year, October is likely to turn in a more muted performance as interest rates stay lower for longer.
  • 5 stocks that want to pay you more

    The recent spate of market volatility is an important reminder to investors that dividends still matter. These companies have the wherewithal and financial strength to consider dividend hikes.
  • 10 stocks for the next 10 years

    Investing for the long haul can smooth out the risks of buying individual stocks. These 10 stocks have attractive long-term growth prospects for investors looking to hold them for a decade or more.
  • Tech stocks surge, but that doesn't mean the bubble is back

    The good news about the recent rebound in the technology sector is that, with only a few exceptions, valuations for these big Nasdaq stocks are all pretty reasonable.

Bonds

  • Global bond issuance reaches fastest pace in nearly a decade

    Companies, countries and U.S. agencies such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are binging on debt in an era of historically low interest rates, sending global bond issuance to its fastest pace in nearly a decade.
  • One way to get 3.5% on a safe government investment

    The government guarantees returns of 3.5% if you hold Series EE savings bonds for 20 years. Is there a catch? Several, but here's why savings bonds can still make a powerful addition to your portfolio.
  • What to do with a $250,000 windfall now

    Some stock analysts feel that this bull market's age combined with somewhat lofty stock price valuations make it vulnerable to a major setback. But you can't base your investing on anxiety and gut feelings or even on investing pundits' prognostications.
  • Yields rise for ultrashort bond funds

    Investors tired of earning next to nothing on their savings are finally getting some relief. Yields on ultrashort bond funds, which buy debt maturing in less than a year, have increased about 30% in the past 12 months.

Investing Strategies

  • 10 stocks for the next 10 years

    Investing for the long haul can smooth out the risks of buying individual stocks. These 10 stocks have attractive long-term growth prospects for investors looking to hold them for a decade or more.
  • Using quality — not just value — for investing

    Harbor Funds portfolio manager Howard Gleicher looks for quality companies whose products or services attract customers for reasons other than price. These five stocks fit the bill.
  • A mid-cap strategy for long-term investors

    Co-managers Kevin Toney and Phil Davidson use a 'quality first, value second' approach to stock picking. Their fund has bested three benchmarks and 95% of its peers. Here's what they like now.
  • How losses affect your risk tolerance

    After a big financial loss, are we more or less willing to take a big risk? For years, two seemingly contradictory theories abounded, but new analysis suggests the right answer is: It depends.