Caring for aging loved ones

How do we plan for longevity, what does it mean to age well, and how can we—and those we love—live safely, securely, and independently for as long as possible?

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We're getting older, we're living longer, and we're changing what it means to age. We're also entering new territory. At some point in our lives, every one of us will need care. Caregiving is a fact of life and that means many of us will find ourselves in the position of providing care for a loved one. Thinking and talking about decisions that may be around the corner for you and your family is critical—because your plans are only secure if your aging loved ones are too.

Caregiving data


70% of us will need long-term care at some point.1
> 1 in 6 American workers provide care for an aging loved one on top of their job.2
Only 30% of caregivers end up providing care for less than a year.3


Caregiving planning & considerations


Preparing a plan

When to step in—Your loved one may not ask for help. Here's how to recognize the signs.

Aging in place—Almost all of us want to but most of us don't end up doing so. Having a plan can help.

Constructive conversations—Ongoing and thoughtful communication is key: both what you talk about and how you talk about it.

Becoming a caregiver—Understand the emotional, logistical, and financial costs of taking on care of a loved one. 


Navigating common concerns

Managing health care and its costs—How to be an effective health care advocate and manage the logistics and administrative details.

Finding the right care for loved ones—Learn the ins and outs of different in-home and out-of-home care options.

Caregiver wellness—How to prioritize your own health as a caregiver and why it's so important.


Tougher topics

Alzheimer's and dementia—Special care considerations for loved ones living with cognitive decline and memory loss.

Financial fraud and abuse—How to prevent financial fraud and recognize the signs of financial abuse.

End of life care—Important conversations and considerations for doing right by your loved one.

Top tips

  • Be proactive: Waiting for a health crisis or medical emergency before planning can mean playing catch-up in an already stressful situation.
  • Plan tough conversations: Choose a time when you won't feel rushed. Know you might need to have more than one talk.
  • Prioritize self-care: Balancing obligations to loved ones with your own needs can be a struggle. Plan for your emotional, physical, and financial needs.

Aging well: A planning, conversation, and resource guide

Download and print for worksheets and checklists to help you build a comprehensive plan for you and your loved one. View guide

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