• Print
  • Default text size A
  • Larger text size A
  • Largest text size A

Do some research before giving to disaster relief

  • By Michelle Singletary,
  • The Washington Post Writers Group
  • – 11/12/2013
  • Charitable Giving
  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • LinkedIn.
  • Google Plus
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Important legal information about the e-mail you will be sending. By using this service, you agree to input your real e-mail address and only send it to people you know. It is a violation of law in some jurisdictions to falsely identify yourself in an e-mail. All information you provide will be used by Fidelity solely for the purpose of sending the e-mail on your behalf.The subject line of the e-mail you send will be "Fidelity.com: "

Your e-mail has been sent.

The images from the Philippines following the destruction of Typhoon Haiyan are heart-wrenching.

"Totally destroyed," one survivor said, describing the city of Tacloban. In another dispatch from Reuters, one woman talked about her 11 missing family members. "I can't think right now," she told the news service. "I am overwhelmed."

Reports of catastrophic human suffering in an already impoverished country may, as with other natural disasters that seem to hit every year, move you to donate clothes, food or money. But before you give, make sure your generosity is helpful and ends up with an organization that will ensure that your gifts are well used.

Con artists see an opportunity to bamboozle people every time disaster strikes. Last year, the Better Business Bureau was warning about scams from bogus contractors as the East Coast was recovering from Hurricane Sandy. The bureau called them "storm chasers."

BBB's Wise Giving Alliance is advising donors about disaster-relief giving. The alliance offers the following tips to avoid mistakes:

Don't make a donation based just on a charity's name

Be careful of start-up charities that carry the name of the disaster. Such quickly established organizations may not have the experience to provide aid. Or worse, the group may just be using the name to attract donations fraudulently.

Take the time to make sure your money is well spent by a charitable organization that has experience in the area that is suffering, in this case the Philippines. Given the level of destruction, your money will be wasted if the charity — even an established one — doesn't have the infrastructure to get the aid to storm victims.

"Relief efforts can be very complex, and if someone doesn't have systems in place, it can get in the way and not bring the value needed," said Edward Johnson, president and chief executive of the BBB that serves metropolitan Washington and eastern Pennsylvania.

Be sure any items you are collecting are needed and can be delivered to victims

The alliance points out that relief charities often prefer to purchase clothing, food and other needed items near the location of the disaster to help speed delivery and avoid freight costs.

Be careful about appeals coming through e-mail and social media

It's worth repeating that you should be wary about such solicitations. These warnings are necessary every time there's great need because people's emotions overtake their sense of caution. You see the images of victims and immediately want to be part of the solution. The con artists know this and use the urgency of the situation to create scams.

Also, be cautious of appeals or Web sites recommended by friends. I've often received e-mails from people who think they are doing a good deed by spreading the word. But they may be letting a scoundrel they haven't checked out reach their network of friends and family. And because someone you know forwards the e-mail, you may be less likely to question it. Nevertheless, check out the charity yourself.

Look into whether the charity is well managed

You can do this by going to give.org, where you can scrutinize a charity's finances. The BBB Wise Giving Alliance has a list of organizations that meet all of the BBB's measurements for charity accountability and have said they are accepting donations for the victims of Typhoon Haiyan. You'll find the list in a release about the mistakes donors make during disasters at www.bbb.org.

You can also find a list of organizations supporting the Philippine relief efforts at www.charitynavigator.org. Click on the link for "Hot Topics" for information about charities' ratings and financial health. Charity Navigator suggests that before you make a donation, you think about the assistance you want to support, such as emergency aid, medical help or long-term relief.

"Due diligence is important," Johnson said. "It is also one of the first things people tend to set aside when they hear the news of a calamity. It's easy to become emotional, and for good reason when you see images of the devastation and loss of life. It's important for consumers to remember that their charitable donation will be just as welcome tomorrow as it is today."

  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • LinkedIn.
  • Google Plus
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Please enter a valid e-mail address
Important legal information about the e-mail you will be sending. By using this service, you agree to input your real e-mail address and only send it to people you know. It is a violation of law in some jurisdictions to falsely identify yourself in an e-mail. All information you provide will be used by Fidelity solely for the purpose of sending the e-mail on your behalf.The subject line of the e-mail you send will be "Fidelity.com: "

Your e-mail has been sent.
© 2013, Washington Post Writers Group
Votes are submitted voluntarily by individuals and reflect their own opinion of the article's helpfulness. A percentage value for helpfulness will display once a sufficient number of votes have been submitted.

Links provided by Fidelity Brokerage Services

fidelity-fbs-iconThese links are provided by Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC ("FBS") for educational and informational purposes only. FBS is responsible for the information contained in the links. FICS and FBS are seperate but affiliated companies and FICS is not involved in the preparation or selection of these links, nor does it explicitly or implicitly endorse or approve information contained in the links.

Published by Fidelity Interactive Content Services

Content for this page, unless otherwise indicated with a Fidelity pyramid logo, is published or selected by Fidelity Interactive Content Services LLC ("FICS"), a Fidelity company with main offices in New York, New York. All Web pages that are published by FICS will contain this legend. FICS was established to present users with objective news, information, data and guidance on personal finance topics drawn from a diverse collection of sources including affiliated and non-affiliated financial services publications and FICS-created content. Content selected and published by FICS drawn from affiliated Fidelity companies is labeled as such. FICS selected content is not intended to provide tax, legal, insurance or investment advice and should not be construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any security by any Fidelity entity or any third-party. Quotes are delayed unless otherwise noted. FICS is owned by FMR LLC and is an affiliate of Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. Terms of use for Third-Party Content and Research.
Content for this page, unless otherwise indicated with a Fidelity pyramid logo, is published or selected by Fidelity Interactive Content Services LLC ("FICS"), a Fidelity company with main offices in New York, New York. All Web pages that are published by FICS will contain this legend. FICS was established to present users with objective news, information, data and guidance on personal finance topics drawn from a diverse collection of sources including affiliated and non-affiliated financial services publications and FICS-created content. Content selected and published by FICS drawn from affiliated Fidelity companies is labeled as such. FICS selected content is not intended to provide tax, legal, insurance or investment advice and should not be construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any security by any Fidelity entity or any third-party. Quotes are delayed unless otherwise noted. FICS is owned by FMR LLC and is an affiliate of Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. Terms of use for Third-Party Content and Research.
fidelity-fbs-iconThese links are provided by Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC ("FBS") for educational and informational purposes only. FBS is responsible for the information contained in the links. FICS and FBS are seperate but affiliated companies and FICS is not involved in the preparation or selection of these links, nor does it explicitly or implicitly endorse or approve information contained in the links.

Before investing, consider the funds' investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses. Contact Fidelity for a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus containing this information.  Read it carefully.